Preparing to Jump

We are about a month away from setting out across the largest ocean on the planet. The list of things to do; for the boat; for the kids; for us; just gets longer but we are confident that we will be able to make the trip safely and comfortably.

This week we are working on the haul-out. We got an insanely high quote last week, and then subsequent tips from fellow cruisers gave us renewed hope that we might not have to spend a fortune for a few coats of paint and some holes in the hull. Once we figure out where and when to haul, we have to decide what we are going to do with the family. Depending on where we haul out we may be able to live on Convivia, but do we want to? Living on a boat “on the hard” means no grey water, no potty, and a 15′ drop if anything or anyone falls off the deck. It most likely means a lot of eating out. Right now I am leaning towards a cheap apartment or hotel for the week that Convivia is out of the water.

Once she is back in we have to start provisioning, and finishing up some above the waterline projects. Amongst these are such gems as, revarnishing all the wood (we use Cetol if you’re wondering), re-beding the stanchions, addressing the portlight leaks, and re-plumbing the water maker. For the provisioning we have an ace in the hole. We just found out that Grand is coming right before we jump. She will be able to help out with some of the harder to find items. For the rest we have Costco and some amazing local markets.

We are also stocking up on gifts for the kids. It’s hard to imagine what 21 days on the Ocean will be like for them, but I would like to have some things to pull out and surprise them with if things get dreary, tense, or complicated.  On the same topic, we need to think about gifts for other kids that we meet along the way.

And 21 days is really just the tip of the iceberg. Once we arrive in the Marquesas we will be faced with insanely expensive provisions. Last year’s puddle jumpers reported $8 beer (yes just one), $16 hamburgers, and $12 melons. So while the 21 day crossing to the Marquesas is certainly the longest single passage, it’s not  the only part that we have to provision for. For the big stuff, we are looking at 6-8 months.

So, are we totally stoked to be crossing the Pacific in a month. YES… but it is going to be a lot of work. I hereby apologize in advance for all the posts I’m not writing, the calls I’m not making, and the photos I’m not taking. We will resume normal operations (with less Internet)  in April.

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Comments

  1. Leah King Markham via Facebook says

    crossing the Pacific! sounds amazingly exciting!!! you & your kids will have memories for a life time :-)

  2. says

    “And 21 days is really just the tip of the iceberg. Once we arrive in the Marquesas we will be faced with insanely expensive provisions. Last year’s puddle jumpers reported $8 beer (yes just one), $16 hamburgers, and $12 melons. So while the 21 day crossing to the Marquesas is certainly the longest single passage, it’s not the only part that we have to provision for. For the big stuff, we are looking at 6-8 months.”

    Aye, that’s the rub, isn’t it?

    Livia & Carol recently posted..Pacific Prep: Provisioning (non-fresh)

  3. says

    My husband and I have been discussing family adventures and 1) our desire to have one (or more), and 2) just what constitutes “adventure” for us non-thrill-seekers. Our most adventurous ideas involve the kids and I finally getting passports (we’ve vowed to complete our end of the process by the end of the month) and taking a Canadian road trip. While these plans are not nearly so adventurous as crossing the Pacific Ocean (except for one really way-out idea that I won’t write down here), I find your family’s journey inspires us to continue to seek adventure on our relatively smaller scale and bring new experiences to our kids and ourselves.

    Our hearts are traveling with you. What an awesome adventure you have ahead of you! I can’t wait to read about it!

    CJ recently posted..An Uncomfortable Silence

    • says

      Adventure is adventure. I believe that the measure of an adventure is not relative to the “greatest adventures” but rather to your own personal comfort zone. The value is derived from stepping outside your comfort level and learning from how you react, adapt and grow. In fact you don’t even have to leave your house to have a great adventure. I am simultaneously having an adventure of the heart, right here on Convivia while we travel the world. Anything that makes your pulse race when you think of it is an adventure.

      I love to get your comments, and am so glad that you are virtually along for the ride!

  4. Sarah says

    For me, planning to cross the Pacific is quite huge. I can imagine the preparation especially with the many uncertainties you might face. I think that will be an extremely exciting experience. God bless on your trip. I am excited to see the stories and pictures when you come back.

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